Wimpy Kid #9: An Exclusive Sneak Peek

Book 9 of Jeff Kinney’s Diary of a Wimpy Kid series, ‘The Long Haul,’ doesn’t hit bookstore shelves until next Tuesday, November 4, but we’ve got an exclusive excerpt now.

Source: www.publishersweekly.com

Wimpy Kid #9: An Exclusive Sneak Peek

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A veteran teacher turned coach shadows 2 students for 2 days – a sobering lesson learned

Granted, and...

The following account comes from a veteran HS teacher who just became a Coach in her building. Because her experience is so vivid and sobering I have kept her identity anonymous. But nothing she describes is any different than my own experience in sitting in HS classes for long periods of time. And this report of course accords fully with the results of our student surveys. 

I have made a terrible mistake.

I waited fourteen years to do something that I should have done my first year of teaching: shadow a student for a day. It was so eye-opening that I wish I could go back to every class of students I ever had right now and change a minimum of ten things – the layout, the lesson plan, the checks for understanding. Most of it!

This is the first year I am working in a school but not teaching…

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One More Really Big Reason to Read Stories to Children

What is it about stories that make them so universally attractive?

Source: www.psychologytoday.com

Stories provide a simplified simulation world that helps us make sense of and learn to navigate our complex real world.  The aspects of our real world that are usually most challenging, most crucial for us to understand, are social aspects.  Knowing how to deal with evil as well as love, how to recognize others’ desires and needs, how to behave towards others so as to retain their friendship, and how to earn the respect of the larger society are among the most important skills we all must develop for a satisfying life.  Stories that we like, and that our children like, are about all that.  They are not explicitly about how to navigate the social world, in the way that a lecture might be.  Rather, they are implicitly about it, so listeners or readers have to construct the lessons for themselves, each in his or her own way.  Constructed lessons are far more powerful than those that are imparted explicitly.

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